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Budget 2018

In a longer than usual Budget speech, and in a slightly more jocular than usual mood, the Chancellor laid out the government’s vision for post-Brexit Britain.

With a raft of measures aimed at shoring up businesses, infrastructure and the health service, Mr Hammond used the better than expected public finances to present an upbeat programme. Leaving some of the major announcements for last, this was a Budget to mark the coming of the end of austerity.

Some of the main announcements were:

  • The personal allowance will be raised to £12,500 from April 2019, one year earlier than planned. The higher rate threshold will also rise to £50,000 from April 2019, also a year earlier than planned, and will remain at the same level in 2020/21.
  • The lifetime allowance for pension savings will increase to £1,055,000 for 2019/20 in line with CPI.
  • The national living wage will increase from £7.83 an hour to £8.21.
  • The annual investment allowance (AIA) will increase to £1 million for all qualifying investments in plant and machinery made on or after 1 January 2019 until 31 December 2020.
  • For entrepreneurs’ relief, the minimum period throughout which the qualifying conditions for relief must be met will be extended from 12 months to 24 months from 6 April 2019.
  • From 1 April 2020, companies will be subject to a 50% limit on the proportion of annual capital gains that can be relieved by brought-forward capital losses. Companies will have unrestricted use of up to £5 million capital or income losses each year.
  • Business rates bills will be cut by one-third for retail properties with a rateable value below £51,000 for two years from April 2019.
  • Capital gains tax lettings relief will only apply where the owner of the property is in shared occupancy with the tenant. The final period exemption will also be generally reduced from 18 months to nine months.
  • The VAT registration threshold be maintained at the current level of £85,000 until April 2022.
  • From 1 April 2020, the amount of payable research and development (R&D) tax credits that a qualifying loss-making company can receive in any tax year will be restricted to three times the company’s total PAYE and NICs liability for that year.
  • From 6 April 2020, when a business enters insolvency, HMRC will be a preferred creditor for taxes collected by the business for the government such as VAT, PAYE income tax, employee NICs, and construction industry scheme deductions – but not such taxes as corporation tax and employer NICs.
  • Large social media platforms, search engines and online marketplaces will be pay a 2% tax on the revenues they earn which are linked to UK users from April 2020.
  • Fuel duty was frozen, alongside beer and spirits.

As usual, announcements that may be relevant to our individual clients will be considered within our normal review process. Please do get in touch if you have any queries.

Full summary available below

Budget Summary 2018

Budget Summary 2018

Tax Tables 

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Spring Statement 2018

Mr Hammond came under pressure ahead of the Spring Statement to loosen the purse strings, but he chose to announce no new spending measures or tax changes.

If these are to come, they will be in the Autumn Budget, the sole ‘fiscal event’ of the year.

Meanwhile the focus of the Spring Statement was on the economy and the public sector’s finances.

14 page summary available below…

Sprint Statement - Summary

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The Chancellor’s second Budget of 2017

Mr Hammond will probably be pleased if commentators decide that his Autumn Budget was a steady-as-she-goes, broadly modest Budget. After the national insurance u-turn he was forced to make after his March Budget this year, that was probably his aim.

In any case, for a variety of economic and political reasons, the Chancellor announced a relatively modest net tax giveaway of just under £1.6 billion for the coming tax year.

His main attention-seeking move was to give first time buyers an exemption from stamp duty land tax on the first £300,000 of value for properties worth up to £500,000. Rumours – probably from the Treasury itself – had trailed changes along these lines, and the new relief represents more than a third of his net giveaway.

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Reduction to money purchase annual allowance (MPAA)

At Spring Budget 2017 the government announced that from 6th April 2017 the money purchase annual allowance (MPAA) will reduce to £4,000. Legislation will be included in Finance Bill 2017.

Anyone who has already triggered the MPAA may wish to consider making maximum use of the current £10,000 MPAA prior to 6th April. Once triggered, it is not possible to use carry forward to increase the MPAA.

As a reminder, we have included a list of the actions that trigger the MPAA and our full guide is available at the link below.

The following will trigger the MPAA (either from a UK registered pension plan or from an overseas scheme that has had UK tax relief)

  • Taking income from a flexi-access drawdown (FAD) plan (includes short term annuity purchase) – only withdrawing tax free cash won’t trigger the MPAA
  • Taking an uncrystallised funds pension lump sum (UFPLS) – if the UFPLS is £10,000 or less, see if it’s possible to take the funds as a ‘small pot’ instead as this won’t trigger the MPAA and isn’t a Benefit Crystallisation Event (BCE).
  • Converting capped drawdown to FAD and then drawing some income
  • Taking more than 150% GAD from a capped drawdown plan
  • Receiving a stand-alone lump sum when entitled to primary protection and Tax Free Cash protection is more than £375,000.
  • Receiving a payment from a flexible lifetime annuity (ie. one where payments can decrease)
  • Receiving a scheme pension from a Defined Contribution (DC) arrangement where it’s being paid directly from those DC funds to less than 11 other members (e.g. a SSAS).
  • In addition, anyone who was in the old ‘flexible drawdown’ before 6th April 2015 is subject to the MPAA from 6th April 2015 (irrespective of whether they have taken an income withdrawal before then)

The above relate to a member and their own funds – these triggers don’t apply where benefits are being paid to a dependant/beneficiary (eg. where a beneficiary receives a FAD income payment from a dependant’s/nominee’s/successor’s FAD arrangement this isn’t a trigger).

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Spring Budget 2016

Throughout the Budget announcement, George Osborne’s overall statement of importance was everything is “for the future” but  “What about the present?”big-ben

The Chancellor stated that he wanted to “close tax loop holes” with social media calling for the true chance of this happening. Never the less, the Chancellor attacked several tax issues.

  • Capital Gain Tax rates are to fall for basic rate Tax payers.
  • ISA limits to be increased.
  • Increase high rate threshold.
  • Tax free personal allowance to rise.
  • New “Lifetime ISA”.
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Autumn Statement 2015

In the first combined Spending Review and Autumn Statement since 2007, the Chancellor’s emphasis was on expenditure. He nevertheless made a range of tax-related announcements. The contents of our Autumn Statement summary covers:

  • Highlights
  • Economic background
  • Capital taxes
  • Savings and pensions
  • Personal taxation
  • Business taxes
  • Welfare
  • Tax administration and simplification
  • Tax avoidance, evasion and compliance
  • Main income tax rates and allowance
  • National Insurance contributions

As usual, announcements that may be relevant to our individual clients will be considered within our normal review process. Please do get in touch if you have any queries.

Click below to read our full summary:

 

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